How Much Food Should I Feed My Dog?

Many of our followers email us reguarly asking the question “how much food should I feed my dog?”  We thought it would be helpful to provide answers to some of the questions we receive about the quantity of food you should be giving your dog.

how much food should I feed my dog after giving birth
How Much Should I Feed My Dog After Giving Birth?

Providing proper nutrition during pregnancy and lactation for the female is essential. Developing puppies depend upon the mother’s diet for essential nutrients, while the female needs to maintain good body condition and be prepared for the stress of lactation.

Fortunately, a feeding program for the reproducing female needs not be complex. Diets containing more than 1600 digestible calories per pound of food and at least 21 percent protein are recommended. The easiest way to ensure proper nutrition is to feed a good quality dog food that is labeled complete and balanced for all life stages such as Purina Dog Chow brand dog food or Purina brand Hi Pro dog meal.

via Common Sense Dog Feeding – Reproduction

How Much Raw Food Should I Feed My Dog Daily?

how much raw food

So you want to feed a homemade raw diet to your dog but you don’t know what quantity he or she should be getting.   The general guideline is to feed 2 to 3% of your pet’s ideal adult body weight. That means if your pet is overweight, you should calculate the food based on their ideal weight, rather than their current weight. The same goes for growing puppies or kittens; they should be fed based on their adult weight, split into 3 to 4 meals throughout the day. Remember that every animal is different, and some will need more or less than others depending on things such as energy level, amount of exercise, metabolism, and even genetics or breed.

via A Simple Guide to Switching to Homemade Raw

How Much Should I Feed My Dog to Lose Weight?

In 2015, an estimated 53.8% of US dogs were overweight or obese.

University of Georgia veterinary surgeon and APOP Board member Dr. Steve Budsberg agrees. “We’re seeing more ‘super-obese’ dogs with devastating knee, hip, and elbow injuries and disease than ever before. Obesity creates tremendous mechanical stresses on bones and joints and that can lead to serious pain and suffering.” The reality is that obesity kills and numerous studies have linked obesity with type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, many forms of cancer, and decreased life expectancy. Our survey validates the notion that obese pets tend to live shorter lives with more medical problems

via 2015 Pet Obesity Statistics

Is Your Dog Overweight?

To tell if your pet could shed a few pounds, feel around his ribs and spine. You should be able to locate both with only a thin layer of fat separating the skin from the bones. If you can’t find the ribcage, you have an overweight dog.

Ask your veterinarian to evaluate your pooch’s size at every check-up. Once your canine reaches maturity, ask for his optimal weight. As a rule of thumb, 15% above that weight is obese; zero to 15% is overweight.

Overweight Dogs: Blame the Breed

Some breeds are prone to obesity, while others (Greyhounds, German Shepherds, Yorkshire Terriers), are typically slim. Small breeds with a propensity for heftiness include:

  • Cairn Terriers
  • Dachshunds
  • Scottish Terriers
  • Cavalier King Charles Spaniels

Medium breeds:

  • Beagles
  • Cocker Spaniels
  • Basset Hounds

Large breeds:

  • Labs
  • Golden Retrievers
  • Rottweilers

Giant breeds:

  • Bernese Mountain Dogs
  • Newfoundlands
  • Saint Bernards

via Overweight Dogs: Weight Loss and Management

How Should I Begin a Weight Loss Program for My Dog?

“Fewer calories in plus more calories out equals weight loss.”

Theoretically, weight loss seems simple enough: fewer calories in plus more calories out equals weight loss. Unfortunately, it’s not as simple as that. You should never put your dog on a diet without the assistance of your veterinary healthcare team. There may be an underlying medical condition that is causing or contributing to your dog’s excess weight. Some common diseases associated with weight gain include hypothyroidism and hyperadrenocorticism (Cushing’s disease). These diseases, along with others, should be eliminated as possible causes or contributors to your dog’s weight problem prior to beginning a diet. Too many dogs start on a diet and fail to lose weight simply because the diet wasn’t the problem – a disease was. Your veterinarian will perform a physical examination and recommend blood tests to ensure that there are no obstacles to weight loss for your pet.

How Much Should I Feed My Dog to Promote Weight Loss?

In order to answer this question, your veterinarian will need to calculate your dog’s ideal weight based on its breed and size. Based on your dog’s degree of excess weight, your veterinarian may recommend a target weight higher than the ideal weight to start. After the dog loses this weight, a re-evaluation will be made to determine whether further weight loss is needed. A safe weight loss for most dogs is 3-5% body weight loss per month.

There are formulas and charts that can be used to calculate exactly how many calories your dog requires to maintain its body weight, and how many calories it needs to achieve its ideal body weight. A basic formula for weight loss in dogs is:

  • [70 x (ideal weight in kg)] ¾ or [70 x (ideal weight in kg)] to the ¾ power

or

  • RER in kcal/day = 30(body weight in kilograms) + 70

To save you making the calculations, the following chart provides calorie requirements based on weight ranges, as follows:

Ideal weight (lbs) Calories to feed (kcal) at 100% RER per day Ideal weight (lbs) Calories to feed (kcal) at 100% RER per day 10 210 55 820 15 270 60 890 20 340 65 950 25 410 70 1020 30 480 75 1090 35 550 80 1160 40 615 85 1230 45 680 90 1300 50 750 100 1430

Note: This is a general guideline only and is not meant as a substitute from your veterinarian’s specific recommendations.

How Much Dry Food Should I Feed My Dog

As with any commercial dog food, the amount of dry food your dog should receive depends on his individual needs.
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Start by purchasing the right type of high-quality dry food for your dog’s age and size. The amount of dry food your dog requires depends on his activity level and overall health and weight. It also depends on whether your dog receives canned as well as dry food. Your veterinarian can give you advice.

Portion Control Versus Free Choice

Many dog owners divide their pet’s meals into two or three feedings daily, with the same amount of food served at each meal. Others allow dogs to consume dry food freely. While the free choice method works for some dogs — those who don’t tend to overeat — in other dogs it’s an invitation to obesity. Another alternative is placing food down for a certain period, perhaps half an hour, then removing the dish with any unconsumed food. You can repeat this process two or three times a day.

Athlete Versus Couch Potato

An athletic or working canine, who spends much of his day in training or on the job, requires more dry dog food than the “couch potato.” For the latter, getting off the sofa and padding over to the food bowl might provide his major exercise. An athletic dog might require 20 to 40 percent more dry food daily than the average canine of the same size, while the couch potato type can thrive on 10 percent less than average.

via How Much Dry Food Should I Feed My Dog? – cuteness.com

Still confused?  Why not try our dog calorie calculator below to help you determine what is right for your dog?
Dog Calorie Calculator
This is a unique calculator that will help you understand how many calories your dog needs every day depending on things like the dog’s age, weight, activity level etc.  It will also help you determine how many cups of food you should be feeding your dog every day.
Dog Calorie Calculator by TrainPetDog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Puppy Potty Training – Facts and Myths

If you bring a dog home, no matter what their age and they are not house-trained, you need to dedicate time and patience to teaching them where it is acceptable to toilet.

This article provides some excellent tips and advice on house-training your dog, regardless of their age.

Puppy potty training is the bane of many new dog parents. That is why there are so many tutorials on how to housetrain a dog, with promises of how it can be simple and effortless.

The fact though, is that potty training requires time, patience, and consistency. How simple or difficult it is, will depend on our dog’s temperament and our own temperament.

Housetraining is usually the first dog training challenge we must face.

Puppy potty training also depends a lot on us. If we are naturally calm, consistent, and patient, housebreaking will seem easier and require less work.

Whatever the case, always remember that we can successfully housetrain a physically healthy dog, at whatever age (after the weaning off process), no matter the history.

1. Set Up a Schedule

Puppy potty training begins, by setting up a schedule. Initially, we want to bring our dog out often, and reduce the chances of her making mistakes inside the house.

I observe my puppy closely, and try to identify patterns in her potty behavior. For example, she usually has to go when she wakes up, and after a bit of vigorous play. Therefore, I took her out after nap-time and after every 10-15 minutes of play. Different dogs may have different patterns depending on size, temperament, routine, and more.

I stop giving her water about 2-3 hours before sleep time, and take her out right before I crate her for the night. If I need to reward her during that time, I only use moist dog treats such as boiled chicken, so that she does not get thirsty from them.

FactDogs learn through a process called conditioning. They repeat behaviors that get them good results and stop behaviors that get them bad results.

The more we reward a puppy for eliminating outside, the more she will repeat that behavior. When my puppy does her business in the backyard, I mark that behavior (Yes!). Once she finishes, I treat her with something special that she only gets for potty success, and give her some good affection. Then, I reward her more with play-time and her favorite activities.

Similarly, the more a puppy practices eliminating inside, on her own, the more she will go in the house. After all, it is convenient and nobody is teaching her that it is inappropriate behavior.

Therefore, we want to not only maximize the number of successes, but also minimize the number of mistakes. In this way, our puppy will learn that doing her business outside is extremely rewarding and fun. On the other hand, when she does it inside, she consistently gets interrupted and taken outside.

The more we reward a puppy for eliminating outside, the more she will repeat the behavior.

2. Prevent Potty Mistakes

There are three ways to prevent mistakes inside the house:

a) Be there to supervise.

When our puppy shows signs that she has to go potty, take her outside right away. If I do not catch my puppy in time and she starts to do her business, then I interrupt her with a no-mark (Ack, ack) and take her outside.

Dogs will only learn when we catch them in the act.

If we are not around and our dog makes a mistake, then we have missed a learning opportunity. All we can do is clean up the mess and move on. It is true that a dog may look sheepish when we shout at her after the fact. This is because she knows that we are upset, so she uses submissive gestures (e.g. putting her head down) to try and appease us.

The dog does not know what particular event has caused our anger, but just that we are angry. Shouting and rubbing a dog’s nose in her own waste does not teach her anything. All it does is confuse our dog, as well as create stress and fear. This can make things worse by causing submissive urination.

b) Crate train our dog.

Dogs do not generally like to soil where they sleep. Keeping our puppy in a crate can discourage her from pottying because she does not want to soil her sleeping area.

The crate is not some magical cure. A crate discourages a dog from eliminating, but if a dog absolutely has to go, she has to go.

Keeping a puppy for too long in a crate, will force her to potty in the crate, possibly traumatize her, and greatly set back our potty training program.

At night, I crate my dogs in the bedroom. Keeping our dogs with us in the bedroom will help with the bonding process, and show them that they are part of the pack.

When puppies are really young, they may not be able to hold their bladder throughout the night. It may be necessary to make an extra trip outside at night, or really early in the morning. Once they get a bit older though, this will no longer be necessary.

Some puppies, e.g. pet store puppies, may already be conditioned to eliminate in their crate, because they are kept in there for overly long periods of time. In such cases, a crate will no longer be a deterrent to potty behavior.

Yes, it is true that if we can be around most of the time to supervise, it is better not to let a puppy do her business in the house at all.

However, if we will be away for long periods of time, if our dog has separation anxiety issues (which may cause her to need to eliminate when we leave), or if there are other medical issues (surgery) that make frequent trips outside unfeasible, then it is perfectly fine to train a dog to both potty on pads, as well as outside.

Reward a puppy for going on his pads, and reward a puppy a lot more for going outside.

3. Clean Away Mistakes Properly

During the housetraining process, there will be some mistakes. When that happens, I calmly no-mark my puppy (Ack, ack) and take her outside. Once we are outside, I praise and reward her if she continues with her business.

Then, I leave my puppy in our fully enclosed and puppy-safe backyard, come in, and clean up the mess. Cleaning up messes in front of a puppy may sometimes cause her to mimic our behavior, and engage in eating her own poop. In her mind, she is only helping to clean out the den.

Use a cleaner that is made especially for pets. A popular pet odor cleaner is Nature’s Miracle.

Do not use ammonia based cleaners as the ammonia odor, which resembles urine, may attract our dog to urinate in the area.

4. Make Sure the Mistakes Are Potty Mistakes

Not all indoor urination is the result of housetraining mistakes. Other reasons for indoor urination include:

  1. Submissive or excitement urination.
  2. Medical issues, e.g. urinary tract infection.
  3. Marking objects or territory.
  4. Stress or anxiety, which results from being alone or other psychological issues.

via Puppy Potty Training – Facts and Myths

We hope you have enjoyed this article – if you are having any specific issues with house-training your dog, do not hesitate to reach out to us and we will do our best to help!

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Types Of Pet Dogs

Dog Breed Selector Tool by TrainPetDog

There are many Types Of Pet Dogs but we will cover some of the most common.

Types of Pet Dogs

 

Labrador Retriever

These dogs are cheerful, gentle, friendly and intelligent.  They are good with children and are energetic and playful.  Easily trained and obey their owners.  They have a double coat which protects them from dold and wet.  Be aware though, they do have a tendency to chew, so watch those favorite shoes!

German Shepherd

Intelligent, loyal, courageous and will guard you like you wouldn’t believe.   Some people are wary of this breed, however, we believe if they are trained correctly from an early age and treated well, this is a suitable breed for kids.  They are fairly low maintenance, no trimming is required but brushing should be done to keep their fur in good condition.  This breed is very easy to train and quick results will be obtained, as they like to please.

Golden Retriever

These dogs are kind, friendly, confident and very intelligent. They are good with children as they are playful and affectionate.  Grooming should be carried out on a regular basis to keep their fur maintained and some trimming is recommended.

Bulldog

Although some say they look quite fierce, they are in fact very friendly and docile.  Be aware though, they are willful, so training may be more of a challenge.  They are quite a low maintenance dog, grooming is not often required, although brushing them will reduce shedding.  Their fur doesn’t need to be trimmed.

Boxer

Brave, energetic, intelligent, loyal and playful, this breed is suitable for children as it has boundless energy and is affectionate.  It has minimal shedding and no trimming is required.  It can be aggressive towards dogs it doesn’t know but is generally good with other household pets.  They do need a fair amount of exercise and require constant leadership to keep them on the right path!

Dachshund

Originating from Germany, this breed is not so good with children.  They are stand-offish with other pets and strangers and have the tendency to snap.  Training is not as easy with other breeds but results will come gradually.  This breed is always up for adventure and are devoted and loyal to their owners.  They are prone to chewing if left alone to much.

Corgi

Cheerful, friendly, intelligent and playful, this breed is suitable for children and is very affectionate.  Grooming is necessary to keep their coat in good condition and to held with shedding but no trimming is required.  It needs physical and mental exercise to be at its best and many bark a lot.

King Charles Spaniel

Playful, socialable, patient and fearless, this breed is great with kids and is energetic and affectionate around them.  This breed does shed regularly, although trimming is not required.  Training is relatively easy but it will be a gradual process.  Spaniels love to chase things and explore their surroundings.

 

Dogs are a man’s best friend, check out the video below for the Top 10 Types of Pet Dogs and see which one is your favorite!


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Best Pet Dogs

If you choose correctly, you can have the Best Pet Dog who will be your best friend and be loyal to you, no matter what!

Consider first though what type of dog you need, do you need a companion, just for you or does it need to be a family dog?  What about young children, if the dog is going to be around young children, you need to choose a dog that is kid-friendly.

Here are some points you should consider before you choose the best pet dog!

Children -friendly

Children often tantalize dogs and are sometimes not as gentle as they should be, therefore you need to choose a dog that is patient, for example a basset hound.  Be warned though, these dogs are quite lazy around the house!  Other examples of children-friendly dogs are Border Terriers, Boston Terriers, Boxers, Cockapoo and Corgis.

Energetic

If you’re choosing a dog for your children, the dog needs to have energy, not one that likes to sleep all day.  For example Spaniels are renowned for their boundless energy.

Best Pet Dog to be Your Best Friend!

an image of Best%20Pet%20Dogs Best-Pet-Dogs_1481755598375.jpg

“dog, best friends, pet dog, best friends, pet”

 Intelligent

If you’re choosing a family dog, it’s important to choose a dog that can easily be trained.  Of course, all dogs need to be trainined but for the safety of your children, you want to make sure you choose a dog that will need the least training to be able to know what is acceptable and what isn’t.  A good example of an easy to train dog is the Golden Retriever, Labrador or Border Collie.

Watch the video to see what a loyal friend dogs can be.


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Names For Pet Dogs

So you’ve chosen your furry friend, so now you need to think about names for your Pet Dog.  We provided some ideas below to help you decide what you will call your new friend as it’s important for your dog to know his name to help when you’re training him or her.

Names for Pet Dogs

an image of Names%20For%20Pet%20Dogs Names-For-Pet-Dogs_1481755654871.jpg

“dog, puppy, animal portrait dog”

There are so many names for pet dogs, how will you choose?  Watch the video below for some ideas and try and choose wisely, as you want your dog to get used to his name as soon as possible, as changing it later will only confuse them.


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Pet Dogs Training

Nobody wants a badly behaved dog, so it’s important that you start to think about your Pet Dogs Training regime.  The earlier you start to train them, the better relationship you will have with your dog further down the line, so that you can enjoy a long and lasting relationship with them.

Pet Dogs Training Regime

an image of Pet%20Dogs%20Training Pet-Dogs-Training_1481755713292.jpg

“training, bordeaux, mastiff training, bordeaux, mastiff”

 

Watch the video below for some top tips for pet dogs training which will help you become the pack leader, so that your dog will love and respect you.

 


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